Foliage Follow-Up, July 2014

Okay, so I skipped a day after Bloom Day, but here goes:

The pretty silver leaves of my baby Lupinus albifrons, planted earlier this year. I can't wait for it to grow bigger!!!

The pretty silver leaves of my baby Lupinus albifrons, planted earlier this year. I can’t wait for it to grow bigger!!!

The Sauromatum venosum I bought last September during our WeHoP trip surprised me by surviving the winter. Not bad for something that tropical looking!

The Sauromatum venosum I bought last September during our WeHoP trip surprised me by surviving the winter. Not bad for something that tropical looking!

It has really cool stalks too!

It has really cool stalks too!

Crappy photo, I know, but I love how the ends of the narrow leaves of Polygonatum verticillatum  have a little curl at the end. So very dainty...

Crappy photo, I know, but I love how the ends of the narrow leaves of Polygonatum verticillatum have a little curl at the end. So very dainty and elegant – like a curled little finger while holding a cup of tea.

I have never seen the  sheaths of the Incense bamboo be this big before. You can imagine the mess below...

I have never seen the sheaths of the Incense bamboo be this big before. You can imagine the mess below…

Considerably less messy, the sheaths of my Sasa Veitchii creates a cool, stripy pattern.

Considerably less messy, the sheaths of my Sasa Veitchii creates a cool, stripy pattern.

Funny how birds always pick either your car, or your showiest foliage to relieve themselves on. So, I photographed the other leaves of my pretty banana - Musa maurellii.

Funny how birds always pick either your car, or your showiest foliage to relieve themselves on. So, I photographed the other leaves of my pretty banana – Musa maurellii. Forgive the splatter.

A Manfreda I rescued during the polar vortex. It had been left outside, and was a soggy, decomposing mess. I took a chance that there was life left in the roots, brought it inside, and was rewarded with pretty spots!

A Manfreda I rescued during the polar vortex. It had been left outside, and was a soggy, decomposing mess. I took a chance that there was life left in the roots, brought it inside, and was rewarded with pretty spots!

Acacia cognata 'Cousin Itt' - oh, how I love that soft texture!

Acacia cognata ‘Cousin Itt’ – oh, how I love that soft texture!

I fell in love with the leaves of Salvia mexicana, long before I realized that they also have really cool neon green calyxes with bright purple blue flowers. Looking forward to that one!

I fell in love with the leaves of Salvia mexicana, long before I realized that they also have really cool neon green calyxes with bright purple blue flowers. Looking forward to that one!

One of the most abuse-tolerant plants in my garden - Hebe 'Quicksilver'.

One of the most abuse-tolerant plants in my garden – Hebe ‘Quicksilver’.

Here it is with another non-fuzzy wonder ' Berberis purpurea nana.

Here it is again with another non-fussy wonder ‘ Berberis purpurea nana.

Lastly - the Woodwardia unigemmata I bought at the Fling last weekend. If all goes well, it will go in the ground in the morning!

Lastly – the massive and scrumptious fronds of the Woodwardia unigemmata I bought at the Fling last weekend. If all goes well, it will go in the ground in the morning!

I really need to get a new camera – or fix the one I cracked on the bathroom floor at Timber Press at the Garden Bloggers’ Fling last weekend. Thank you for your patience while I make do with my phone. For more interesting and flabbergasting foliage from the world over, move over to Pam Penick’s blog Digging! Ciao!

About annamadeit

I was born and raised in Sweden, By now, I have lived almost as long in the United States. The path I’ve taken has been long and varied, and has given me a philosophical approach to life. I may joke that I’m a sybarite, but the truth is, I find joy and luxury in life’s simple things as well. My outlook on life has roots in a culture rich in history and tradition, and I care a great deal about environmental stewardship. Aesthetically, while drawn to the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia, I also have a deep appreciation for the raw, the weathered, and the worn - materials that tell a story. To me, contrast, counterpoint, and diversity are what makes life interesting and engaging. Color has always informed everything I do. I’m a functional tetrachromat, and a hopeless plantoholic. I was originally trained as an architect working mostly on interiors, but soon ventured outside - into garden design. It’s that contrast thing again… An interior adrift from its exterior, is like a yin without a yang. My firm conviction that everything is connected gets me in trouble time and time again. The world is a big place, and full of marvelous distractions, and offers plentiful opportunities for inquiry and exploration. I started writing to quell my constant queries, explore my discoveries, and nurture my curiosity. The Creative Flux was started in 2010, and became a catch-all for all kinds of intersecting interests. The start of Flutter & Hum at the end of 2013 marks my descent into plant nerd revelry. I occasionally contribute to other blogs, but those two are my main ones. For sure, topics are all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blogs!
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2 Responses to Foliage Follow-Up, July 2014

  1. Pam/Digging says:

    Gorgeous acacia. I’m so surprised to see your lupine, which closely resembles our native bluebonnets and which have gone dormant since early summer. Bummer about camera — and on the first day! How did you get by without it? Does that mean you actually looked at the gardens with your eyes, rather than through a camera lens? 😉

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks Pam! I did some research on it once, and it turns out that Oregon is home to over 50 of about 165 different species of lupine. Pretty amazing, I think! This one will eventually showcase many blue spires from a single root, so it is more of a shrub – about 3-4′ across. I’m moving it today – I think it needs more sun! Oh the camera – luckily I could still take pictures with it up until I changed the battery in Floramagoria on the 3rd day. So yes – after that eyes, and an occasional phone picture! 🙂

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