Bloom Day – February 2015

Beautiful weather and temps in the 50’s and 60’s have things moving along quite well.

My most wonderful surprise, and one that I know for sure that you're not sick of seeing is the flower that emerged from one of my air plants. Both of these were given to me by Matt the Lents Farmer this past summer. I'm so excited it decided to bloom!  :)

My most wonderful surprise this month, and one that I know for sure that you’re not sick of seeing is the flower that emerged from one of my air plants. Both of these were given to me by Matt the Lents Farmer this past summer. I’m so excited it decided to bloom! 🙂

One of my late winter faves, Edgeworthia chrysantha is blooming. I'd say about half of the buds have still to open. Usually when we have unusually cold winters, the buds never open. I think this one is doing as well as it is because the one Arctic Blast we had, happened in early November when the buds weren't as developed and vulnerable yet. At least that's why I think its doing as well as it is - it was so cold back then...

One of my late winter faves, Edgeworthia chrysantha is blooming. I’d say about half of the buds have still to open. Usually when we have unusually cold winters, the buds never open. I think this one is doing as well as it is because the one Arctic Blast we had, happened in early November when the buds weren’t as developed and vulnerable yet. At least that’s why I think its doing as well as it is – it was so cold back then…

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The inevitable close-up. I promise - this is the last photo of this plant.

The inevitable close-up. I promise – this is the last photo of this plant.

The Grevillea 'Scarlet sprite' has a few more flowers on it than it did last month, but still not exploding.

The Grevillea ‘Scarlet sprite’ has a few more flowers on it than it did last month, but still not exploding.

Euphorbia rigida is still blooming.

Euphorbia rigida is still blooming.

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One of my fave Swedish childhood memories - when these bloomed, you knew spring had arrived! It used to be Anemone hepatica or Hepatica nobles - either name works.

One of my fave Swedish childhood memories – when these bloomed, you knew spring had arrived! Anemone hepatica or Hepatica nobilis – either name works.

Black pussy-willow or Salix gracistylus 'Melanostachys' - a plant I probably never should have planted, given how large it gets. Up to 10' tall and 15' wide! Yikes!

Black pussy-willow or Salix gracistylus ‘Melanostachys’ – a plant I probably never should have planted, given how large it gets. Up to 10′ tall and 15′ wide! Yikes!

This one is a little further along and has lost its black fuzz.

This one is a little further along and has lost its black fuzz.

I love my black Hellebores!

I love my black Hellebores!

Managed to cut off the edge of this photo, but wanted to include it because you can see the center better. So pretty...

Managed to cut off the edge of this photo, but wanted to include it because you can see the center better. So pretty…

I rely on this Daphne to scent the neighborhood - so good!

I rely on this Daphne to scent the neighborhood – so good!

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More Hellebores!

More Hellebores!

 

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Don't think I ever realized that Pachysandra has flowers too - cute little fuzzy ones.

Don’t think I ever realized that Pachysandra has flowers too – cute little fuzzy ones.

Camellia 'Yuletide' is slowing down, but not entirely done.

Last but not least – Camellia ‘Yuletide’ is slowing down, but not entirely done. It’s been going full tilt boogie since November.

To see what else is blooming in gardens around the world May Dreams Gardens, where Carol is hosting this monthly meme.

 

About annamadeit

Born and raised in Sweden, my aesthetics and outlook on life are strongly shaped by a culture rich in history and tradition. I care a great deal about environmental responsibility, and my aesthetic reflects the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia. I was trained as an architect at the University of Cincinnati and as a color specialist at the Scandinavian Colour Institute in Stockholm. I'm obsessed with plants and gardens, and aim to take my skill set a step further by designing gardens as well as interiors. As someone so aptly said: " Architecture is the skin that separates the exterior from the interior". So true - you can't successfully focus on one without incorporating the other. I'm also an avid cook, and I love to ski. In addition, I put time and efforts into trying to rectify things that I feel are wrong in my immediate community. As you will see, The Creative Flux will touch on all these things, and more. For sure, it's all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blog!
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12 Responses to Bloom Day – February 2015

  1. mattb325 says:

    So many lovely blooms! I’m sure that you are pleased the garden thinks it’s spring – hopefully the worst of winter is behind you 🙂

    • annamadeit says:

      Haha – this year it’s more like we SKIPPED winter altogether. Except for a few really cold days in early November. So weird, but I have a feeling that weird weather is the new normal – for the entire planet.

  2. Rose says:

    I didn’t know that air plants had blooms–what a neat surprise! Love the Edgeworthia; I wish we could grow it here. We can grow Hellebores, but it will be awhile before mine bloom, so it’s lovely to see yours. Happy Bloom Day!

    • annamadeit says:

      Yeah, as you can imagine, I was almost giggling with delight! So fun… Hang in there Rose – Spring will come soon. The fact that it’s here already – to this degree – is worrying me. I know one year doesn’t define climate change, but the non-winter we had is freaky! Dry and warm – yikes!

  3. Alison says:

    Happy GBBD! The black Hellebore is wonderful! Hooray that your Edgeworthia didn’t get knocked back by cold this winter, but the warm, early spring is disturbing.

    • annamadeit says:

      Totally agree, Alison – it is very disturbing. I don’t like it one bit… But, since there isn’t much a single human can do about it, I’m focusing on its perks – Edgeworthia included!

  4. Kris P says:

    Your garden is full of treasures Anna! I love that Edgeworthia – and the Daphne. Both will grow here, technically speaking, but I know from experience with a Daphne that they’re unlikely to be happy, especially given our water shortage. I’ll just enjoy yours so include as many photos of each as you’d like!

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks Kris! Those round, yellow balls tickle me to no end, so I’ll keep the photos coming, now that I know that at least one person looks forward to them. (I’m starting to feel like I post the same damn thing every time, so you just made me feel better!) 🙂

  5. rickii says:

    Edgeworthia has been growing on me. I think you just clinched the deal…not that I’m ignoring your other beauties, especially the sweet bloom on the aior plant.

    • annamadeit says:

      If you want, you can give one of my low-laying Edgeworthia branches a try. I checked the other day, and they have spontaneously rooted! Come on over and take your pick! The size of the roots don’t correspond to the size of the branches quite yet, but maybe it would survive?

  6. My garden is frozen solid but I do have a badass silk orchid that is always blooming. 😉 I had no idea air plants had flowers. Very cool!

    • annamadeit says:

      Yeah, I was thrilled to pieces! And, I learned something interesting this winter. I almost forgot to bring in a rescued Cymbidium orchid from outside. I swear – it was almost frost nights by the time I remembered to bring it in. I thought for sure it would die, and left it to its own devices for weeks on end. Couldn’t believe my eyes when one day I noticed that it had shot up 5 (!) new flower stalks that were in full bud. The explanation was that they need some cold to come back. Total beginner’s luck, huh?

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