Bloom Day – June 2015

Aaaahhh – how does anyone keep up with anything this time of year? It’s a quarter to ten on Bloom Day, which, I guess, makes it Bloom Night. Bloom Day is a meme hosted by Carol at May Dreams Garden – click over there to see what gardeners all over the world have in their gardens today.

In the blue light of evening, Eryngium 'Sapphire biue' looks magnificently blue.

In the blue light of evening, Eryngium ‘Sapphire biue’ looks magnificently blue.

So does Hydrangea 'Tricolor' with white edges glowing in the shade under the Big Magnolia.

So does Hydrangea ‘Tricolor’ with white edges glowing in the shade under the Big Magnolia.

The Big Magnolia is also in full bloom. Creamy white, bowl-sized flowers that smell like a citrusy vanilla. Mmmm...

The Big Magnolia is also in full bloom. Creamy white, bowl-sized flowers that smell like a citrusy vanilla. Mmmm…

Here is what passersby, walking down our street see when they pass by us - a riot of mostly red and green.

Here is what passersby, walking down our street see when they pass by us – a riot of mostly red and green.

Here is another shot, capturing more of the street, including the first Hebe I ever planted. It is in full bloom now. My dear, supportive husband says my plantings are in violation of city codes as they encroach on the sidewalk space so that people in wheelchairs can't get by. He's probably right - I have yet to see a person in a wheelchair try.

Here is another shot, capturing more of the street, including the first Hebe I ever planted. It is covered in its little white blossoms now. My dear, supportive husband says my plantings are in violation of city codes as they encroach on the sidewalk space so that people in wheelchairs can’t get by. He’s probably right – I have yet to see a person in a wheelchair try.

Hot Cocoa rose.

Hot Cocoa rose.

The corner by our driveway is occupied by red lilies this time of year. They work splendidly with the Hot Cocoa roses in the previous shot, and are prevented from flopping over by being ensnared in (read; supported by) the red Barberry.

The corner by our driveway is occupied by red lilies this time of year. They work splendidly with the Hot Cocoa roses in the previous shot, and are prevented from flopping over by being ensnared in (read; supported by) the red Barberry.

Last shot from the front yard - I promise. This shows the required foot of space in front of the "containing wall" I built - the one where all that other stuff in the previous photos grow. Cram-scaping rules, my friends.

Last shot from the front yard – I promise. This shows the required foot of space in front of the “containing wall” I built – the one where all that other stuff in the previous photos grow. Cram-scaping rules, my friends. Or, perhaps it is the path of least resistance – I could be more diligent in weeding out volunteer Swordferns, expanding Carex, and the Rush that suddenly appeared – but I’m not.

In a manner similar to my wheelchair obstructions in the front, the Cotinus 'Golden Spirit' adjusts the posture of anyone over 4' tall, at the entrance to the backyard. I should have pruned it, but I didn't. And now it is too pretty... Who has the heart...?

In a manner similar to my wheelchair obstructions in the front, the Cotinus ‘Golden Spirit’ adjusts the posture of anyone over 4′ tall, at the entrance to the backyard. I should have pruned it, but I didn’t. And now it is too pretty… Who has the heart…?

Towering over the back fence is this Clematis - a misbehaving mass of purple that entangled in love-making with a nearby Dawn Viburnum. This was not part of the plan, as it now effectively shades a baby Tetrapanax which is struggling to get its head above the Edgeworthia in the front. I will likely let it finish blooming, and then cut it back to release the encaged baby.

Towering over the back fence is this Clematis – a misbehaving mass of purple that entangled in passionate love-making with a nearby Dawn Viburnum. This was not part of the plan, as now, the two effectively shade a baby Tetrapanax, which is struggling to get its head above the Edgeworthia in the front. I will likely let it finish blooming, and then cut it back to release said encaged baby.

Here is a shot from a different angle. See that burgundy clematis beyond the purple monster? It has proven much better behaved. The mask between the two was made by a student at one of my kid's school. I think I need to move it out where I can get to it without the use of a machete.

Here is a shot from a different angle. See that burgundy clematis beyond the purple monster? It has proven much better behaved. The mask between the two was made by a student at one of my kid’s school. I think I need to move it out where I can get to it without the use of a machete.

A glance into the space behind our garage reveals that the Foxtail lilies are in full bloom. The nursery pots you can see all around, are holding treasures that still need to find a home. Pretty sure my family is gearing up for an intervention of sorts...

A glance into the space behind our garage reveals that the Foxtail lilies (Eremurus) are in full bloom. The nursery pots you can see all around, are holding treasures that still need to find a home. Pretty sure my family is gearing up for an intervention of sorts…

The Asiatics are much appreciated wherever they pop up.

The Asiatics are much appreciated wherever they pop up.

An attempt at a planter I just planted, containing Canna 'Cleopatra', Nandina filamentosa, a Black cordyline, a red Begonia, and a few other things. I can't wait for it to fill out!

A partial view of a planter I just planted, containing Canna ‘Cleopatra’, Nandina filamentosa, a Black cordyline, a red Begonia, and a few other things. I can’t wait for it to fill out!

Another Eryngium in bloom, with an Agastache blooming in the background.

Another Eryngium in bloom, with an Agastache blooming in the background.

Quite possibly the loveliest Hellebore I have in terms of foliage, and the trusty Nasturtium that someone planted long before we bought this house. They come back every year, and I can't say I mind. :)

Quite possibly the loveliest Hellebore I have in terms of foliage, with the trusty Nasturtium that someone planted long before we bought this house. They come back every year, and I can’t say I really mind. 🙂

I have a soft spot for Santolina's little yellow button flowers.

I have a soft spot for Santolina’s little yellow button flowers…

... and the red bells of the Abutilon make me happy!

… and the red bells of the Abutilon make me so very happy!

The most interesting foliage of my most recent acquisition - a Crinum bulbispermum. Can't wait to see what its flowers will look like!

The most interesting octopus foliage of my most recent acquisition – a Crinum bulbispermum. Can’t wait to see what its flowers will look like!

Finally , Schizophragma hydrangeoides 'Moonlight' scrambling up our wall, at dusk. By now, quite literally, in moonlight. Goodnight!

Finally , Schizophragma hydrangeoides ‘Moonlight’ scrambling up our wall, at dusk. By now, quite literally, in moonlight. Goodnight!

 

 

 

About annamadeit

Born and raised in Sweden, my aesthetics and outlook on life are strongly shaped by a culture rich in history and tradition. I care a great deal about environmental responsibility, and my aesthetic reflects the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia. I was trained as an architect at the University of Cincinnati and as a color specialist at the Scandinavian Colour Institute in Stockholm. I'm obsessed with plants and gardens, and aim to take my skill set a step further by designing gardens as well as interiors. As someone so aptly said: " Architecture is the skin that separates the exterior from the interior". So true - you can't successfully focus on one without incorporating the other. I'm also an avid cook, and I love to ski. In addition, I put time and efforts into trying to rectify things that I feel are wrong in my immediate community. As you will see, The Creative Flux will touch on all these things, and more. For sure, it's all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blog!
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22 Responses to Bloom Day – June 2015

  1. b12alley says:

    I am new to the blogging scene, as you know. Bloom Day was like a “dream come true” for me. I have many friends who are plants, but not many friends that know plants. This was just beautiful.
    Thanks to you, Carol and John V. and all those others bloggers for sharing.
    I will be looking at all those Bloom Day postings over and over. I feel like I have more friends that know plants now. Oh, happy day!!!

    • annamadeit says:

      I agree – in a sense it makes you feel like you found your new extended family. I learned about it from my friend Jane (Mulchmaid). After she added me to an Oregon blogger group, I have gotten a lot of new friends who I value dearly. Welcome to our kind and sharing world! 🙂

  2. commonweeder says:

    I loved visiting your garden and seeing that eryngium. I am hoping mine has come through our terrible winter. It is not a sure thing.

    • annamadeit says:

      Fingers crossed for your Eryngium. To make you feel better – these were all rescues from last year. There was hardly a sign of life when I stuck them in the ground. I don’t expect them all to be big in this year of convalescence, but I was thrilled to see them. 🙂

  3. Pingback: What’s in Bloom Here Now – June 2015 | A Moveable Garden

  4. rickii says:

    Either you are the world’s best editor when you point your camera, or your garden is absolutely perfect. I’ve had my eye on my one surviving Eryngium (I love them all, but they do not seem to return the favor). It had been coming along nicely and close to flowering. This morning there is no sign of it…no hole or debris left by marauders…nothing. Color me puzzled.

    • annamadeit says:

      Oh what a DRAG, Rickii…. Well, I rescued several of our unsold Eryngiums last year, and they are all emerging – at different rates, mind you. I will happily share if you want a new one. You are welcome to come over anytime and see my project. (And yes, I am a pretty good editor!) 😉

  5. mattb325 says:

    Fantastic – so much to see, and I love your cram-scaping….every square inch is covered in plants. Just as it should be 🙂

  6. Kris P says:

    From the Eryngium to the Schizophyragma (a marvelous name for a genus), every plant you showed was spectacular. I have a soft spot for that blue Clematis even if it is a thug. Your red and green street view is a gorgeous combination of colors and shapes but then that’s not a surprise.

    • annamadeit says:

      Aw, thank you Kris! I do love that Clematis too, but this year I wanted it to grow the other way to let some light down to my fledgling Tetrapanax. I figured once it powers its way up through the other stuff, it will look fantastic towering over the rest. Now, of course, if I had planned this correctly, I would have planted the Tetrapanax first. But, I will chalk that mistake up to the ever-evolving learning curve. 🙂

  7. Your garden is a fantasy land of beautiful flowers ! The Hydrangea is especially magical , Anna . I like the combination you chose for your pot with the B. Boliviensis, and dark foliage . An intervention wouldn’t begin to touch the level of addiction we share 😊 Extended family is such a nice way to put it . ..

  8. annamadeit says:

    Thanks! I wish my family agreed – instead, during this time of year, it often makes two of them sneeze! But you are right about the addiction – it is pretty much untouchable. And we could do so much worse… right? This may be harmful to our wallets, but at least it is not damaging our health. 🙂

  9. Alison says:

    Oh, that hot cocoa rose is lovely. I wish roses were easier to care for. I love looking at them in other people’s gardens. Thanks for sharing your blooms on Bloom Day (or Bloom Night).

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks! It’s pretty cool. I got two of them by chance, and only keep them because of its cool color. One ended up in the parking strip this year, and I think it helped its blackspot quite a bit. Other than that (which I usually don’t bother trying to remedy, they have been trouble free. 🙂

  10. Pauline says:

    Your blue clematis is fantastic, do you know it’s name? You have some lovely combinations of plants and foliage and your red rose in your front garden is stunning!

    • annamadeit says:

      Sorry Pauline – not sure how I missed your comment… I’m pretty sure it’s the classic ol’ Clematis jackmanii, bought in a little plastic bag at the grocery store several years ago. Who would have thunk…? 🙂

  11. Peter/Outlaw says:

    Your garden is overflowing with beauty! Cramscaping is wonderful as there are simply so many beautiful plants that we must have in our limited spaces!

  12. Love all your red flowers, your Lilies, Clemeatis and Eremurus. I grow mostly shorter plants right along the sidewalk. One of the neighbors told me she was a afraid to walk along my garden because she thought some wild animal would leap out and attack her.

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