Wendy’s wall

This past spring I designed a dry-stacked rock wall for a delightful woman named Wendy.

Her front yard sloped rather steeply down toward the street. There was a massive boulder that she wanted to leave in place, as  the roots of the Maple above it were located directly underneath it. Could I help her design a wall that would incorporate it without moving it? But of course!

Her front yard sloped rather steeply down toward the street. There was a massive boulder that she wanted to leave in place, as the roots of the Maple above it were located directly underneath it. Could I help her design a wall that would incorporate it without moving it?

The height was determined by where the wall of their neighbor ended. As for the rock, we incorporated another few larger boulders in an attempt to make it a less singular feature. Wendy had specified that she wanted the wall to have a naturalistic feel, and not look rigid and fabricated. Dreaming up a design is one thing, and execution another. My gratitude goes out to Apromiano and Mario of Drake's 7 Dees, who turned my concept into reality. As Wendy put it - "Apromiano is an artist! "

The height of the basalt wall was determined by where the wall of their neighbor ended – we just continued ours where it left off. As for the rock, we incorporated another few larger boulders in an attempt to make it a less singular feature. Wendy had specified that she wanted the wall to have a naturalistic feel, and not look rigid and fabricated. Dreaming up a design is one thing, and execution another. My appreciation goes out to Apromiano and Mario of Drake’s, who turned my drawing into reality. As Wendy put it – “Apromiano is an artist! ” She’s right – those two did a wonderful job!

The wall curves beautifully around the large stone.

The wall curves beautifully around the large stone.

The area in front was filled with river rock, and the newly created room on the slope side was filled with compost and planted.

The area in front was filled with river rock, and the newly created room on the slope side was filled with soil and planted. For lack of a better word – we created a “containing wall”. Some of the plants we used were Acanthus ‘Whitewater’, Hakonechloa, Carex ‘Snow Cap’ Saxifraga ‘Maroon beauty’, a dwarf Thalictrum, Epimedium, Mukdenia and Heuchera.

The other large rocks anchor the wall at the other end.

The other large rocks visually anchor the wall at the other end. Now, with temperatures starting to drop, we planted it yesterday, and it looks mighty promising! The planting will be in the shade of the Maple for most of the day. In addition to the other plants, I gave her a start of one of my faves – Iris confusa. It looks great when draping over a wall and does well in filtered light … Can’t wait for it all to grow and fill in! 

 

 

About annamadeit

I was born and raised in Sweden, By now, I have lived almost as long in the United States. The path I’ve taken has been long and varied, and has given me a philosophical approach to life. I may joke that I’m a sybarite, but the truth is, I find joy and luxury in life’s simple things as well. My outlook on life has roots in a culture rich in history and tradition, and I care a great deal about environmental stewardship. Aesthetically, while drawn to the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia, I also have a deep appreciation for the raw, the weathered, and the worn - materials that tell a story. To me, contrast, counterpoint, and diversity are what makes life interesting and engaging. Color has always informed everything I do. I’m a functional tetrachromat, and a hopeless plantoholic. I was originally trained as an architect working mostly on interiors, but soon ventured outside - into garden design. It’s that contrast thing again… An interior adrift from its exterior, is like a yin without a yang. My firm conviction that everything is connected gets me in trouble time and time again. The world is a big place, and full of marvelous distractions, and offers plentiful opportunities for inquiry and exploration. I started writing to quell my constant queries, explore my discoveries, and nurture my curiosity. The Creative Flux was started in 2010, and became a catch-all for all kinds of intersecting interests. The start of Flutter & Hum at the end of 2013 marks my descent into plant nerd revelry. I occasionally contribute to other blogs, but those two are my main ones. For sure, topics are all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blogs!
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16 Responses to Wendy’s wall

  1. mattb325 says:

    I love it! I know how much work and effort goes into these things, but they look lovely when finished – and it will only continue to look better as it ages, gets mossy and the plants cascade over it 🙂

  2. rusty duck says:

    That’s a great job. I hope you show it again next Spring when the planting is starting to fill out.

  3. I can’t thank Anna and her team from Drake’s enough for the beautiful job they did on our new rock wall! We have received numerous compliments from neighbors and passers-by. It turned out much better than I had ever visualized myself. It really pays off to hire a creative, professional landscape artist; so glad I found Anna!

  4. Great job! Somehow you managed to create a wall that would work to contain the slope and be naturalistic at the same time.
    This is one to remember.
    Thanks for sharing your work with us who aspire to take on such projects in our own gardens.

  5. rickii says:

    A satisfying solution and high praise from the client. What could be better?

  6. Beautiful! I love a well crafted stone wall. 🙂

  7. Peter/Outlaw says:

    It’s a great wall! Such a breath of fresh air to see an actual rock wall. Here, there’s an overuse of the box store interlocking concrete thingy walls. There’s nothing wrong with them but, especially around older homes, they look out of place and a bit boring compared to rock or brick walls.

  8. annamadeit says:

    Thanks Peter! We have a lot of those here too, and it is true that they look out of place when used out of context. That said, I admit I used some in my garden, because it was cheap, quick and easy. Not my fave either, but being how shady my backyard is, I was hoping for rapid moss coverage. That, and lots of plants cascading over it. It softens those unsightly lines up a little… But yes – the guys did a really nice job on this one! 🙂

  9. It does look great. The boulder “fits”, providing contrast without looking out of place.

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