Bloom Day – September 2015

Not much is new , and the garden is trudging along at its own pace. Temperatures have dropped for now, but I don’t think summer is over quite yet. Even so, this blissful respite seems to have all living things breathing a sigh of relief.

Last month it started to bloom - this month it is covered! Not only that, it generously shares all the spent flowers.

Last month, the Anisacanthus (or Hummingbird bush) started to bloom – this month it is covered! Not only that, it generously shares all the spent flowers.

Here a nearby Corokia cotoneaster has broken their fall, and they have gotten caught up in its webby branching structure. Love it!

Here a nearby Corokia cotoneaster has broken their fall, and they have gotten caught up in its webby branching structure. Love it!

One of its flowers caught by a spider's thread.

One of its flowers caught by a barely visible spider’s thread.

It looks frozen in time and space.

It looks frozen in time and space.

Zauschneria - another hummingbird favorite.

Zauschneria – another hummingbird favorite.

A Salvia I forgot the name of, but the bright red assures me it's a keeper.

A Salvia I forgot the name of, but the bright orange-red assures me it’s a keeper. UPDATE: Okay, so I checked – this is Salvia greggii ‘Flame’. 

Yet another Salvia - this one is more of a true red.

Yet another Salvia – this one is more of a raspberry red.

I'm astounded by this plant. It has bloomed off and on all year long. There aren't a lot of flowers on it now, but there are some, and I'm grateful for each one. This is most definitely elbowing itself into a spot on my Top 10 list.

Grevillea ‘Red Sprite’ is at it again! I’m astounded by this plant. It has bloomed off and on all year long. There aren’t a lot of flowers on it now, but there are some, and I’m grateful for each one. This is most definitely elbowing itself into a spot on my Top 10 list.

The Abutilon I thought I had lost is humoring me with more flowers.

The Abutilon I thought I had lost is humoring me with more flowers.

The leaves have not come back, but it does have several new buds. It made me very happy to see that.

The leaves have not come back, but it does have several new buds. It made me very happy to see that.

This one didn't do much this year, probably because I forgot to water it. The lower temperatures we've enjoyed for the last week has been good for it, it seems. I'm going to move this one to where I can see it, so I won't forget again...

This Fuchsia ‘Millennium’ didn’t do much this year, probably because I forgot to water it. The lower temperatures we’ve enjoyed for the last week has been good for it, it seems. I’m going to move this one to where I can see it, so I won’t forget again…

An annual Ipomea I rescued from work.

An annual Ipomea I rescued from work.

I like its little buds too.

I like its little buds too.

Rosa 'Twilight Zone' - nice, fragrant blooms, but needs a better spot, and I see some blackspot on its leaves. Maybe I'll stick it in the hellstrip with the Hot Cocoa. It has shown a huge improvement since being moved. In fact, because of the Hot Cocoa's performance this year, I now understand why some people love roses. Maybe a little more hardship will make this one perform as well.

Rosa ‘Twilight Zone’ – fabulous purple, fragrant blooms, but needs a better spot, and I see some blackspot on its leaves. Maybe I’ll stick it in the hellstrip with the Hot Cocoa. It has shown a huge improvement since being moved. In fact, because of the Hot Cocoa’s performance this year, I now understand why some people love roses. Maybe a little more hardship will make this one perform as well.

Ornamental oregano 'Purple Falls' draping over the edge of a planter.

Ornamental oregano ‘Purple Amethyst Falls’ draping over the edge of a planter.

Clematis durandii rambling through a Hebe, with a happy houseplant palm in the background.

Clematis durandii rambling through a Hebe, with a houseplant palm in the background.

Housed in the planter with my Dwarf Elm is Liriope 'Royal purple' and a dwarf Acorus.

Housed in the planter with my Dwarf Elm is Liriope ‘Royal purple’ and a dwarf Acorus.

This one was sold as

This one – a Thunbergia grandiflora – was sold as “blue”. Don’t know about you, but I’d call that purple. I still like it, though.

Especially when the light hits it right. I like the fuzzy buds even more than I like the flowers.

Especially when the light hits it right. I like the fuzzy buds even more than I like the flowers.

False hemp or Datisca cannabina - close-up of their little flowers.

False hemp or Datisca cannabina – close-up of their long, dangly flowers. Or, by now, it looks like they are setting seed.

The Callistemon viridiflora is producing more buds. I had a flower earlier - I was as proud as can be!

The Callistemon viridiflora is producing more buds. I had a flower earlier – I was as proud as can be!

The golden yellow of the Bronze fennel flowers look so good against its wispy black foliage.

The golden yellow of the Bronze fennel flowers look so good against its wispy black foliage.

Hydrangea 'Little Lime' is happier now that it is finally in the ground.

Hydrangea ‘Little Lime’ is happier now that it is finally in the ground.

Lastly, the bud of a mystery plant that are coming up all over the side yard. I know I planted them, but I forget what they are. I'm thinking they might be Nerine lilies, but can't remember. I suppose by next Bloom Day, we'll know...

Lastly, the bud of a mystery plant that are coming up all over the side yard. I know I planted them, but I forget what they are. I’m thinking they might be Nerine lilies, but can’t remember. I suppose by next Bloom Day, we’ll know…

Head over to Carol at May Dreams Gardens to see what is blooming in gardens across the globe. Thanks for hosting, Carol!

About annamadeit

Born and raised in Sweden, my aesthetics and outlook on life are strongly shaped by a culture rich in history and tradition. I care a great deal about environmental responsibility, and my aesthetic reflects the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia. I was trained as an architect at the University of Cincinnati and as a color specialist at the Scandinavian Colour Institute in Stockholm. I'm obsessed with plants and gardens, and aim to take my skill set a step further by designing gardens as well as interiors. As someone so aptly said: " Architecture is the skin that separates the exterior from the interior". So true - you can't successfully focus on one without incorporating the other. I'm also an avid cook, and I love to ski. In addition, I put time and efforts into trying to rectify things that I feel are wrong in my immediate community. As you will see, The Creative Flux will touch on all these things, and more. For sure, it's all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blog!
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11 Responses to Bloom Day – September 2015

  1. Kris P says:

    Out of all your lovely photos, I’m fixated on the ornamental oregano, wondering why I don’t have more of that. I love the ‘Twilight Zone’ rose too – I planted ‘Ebb Tide’, which is similar in color, 2 years ago but it doesn’t bloom much. I’ve heard ‘Twilight Zone’ is the stronger of the 2 so I may need to trade up. Happy GBBD Anna!

    • annamadeit says:

      Happy GBBD to you too, Kris! I think Ebb Tide is the parent of Twilight Zone, with a lot of the same attributes, but – to my nose, at least – Ebb Tide seems to have somewhat stronger fragrance. As for the Oregano, it was kind of late in the summer when I planted it, so it hasn’t yet developed those long, scaly flowers. I see some evidence of it happening (which is encouraging), but I’m still holding my breath that I got the right variety. They are so cool when they mature!

  2. Alison says:

    Happy GBBD! So many interesting flowers. I have a few different ornamental oreganos, but not that one. Love the flower caught in the spider’s web.

  3. mattb325 says:

    The rose is stunning. That colour is quite amazing! I have heard that the darker coloured roses suffer sunburn (which can wreck the flowers), and I know that the deeper reds need a little protection from hot afternoon sun.
    Speaking of reds, that NoID salvia is really pretty. I have to rebuild my stocks after last winter killed off all my salvia and agastaches 🙂

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks Matt! The color is indeed quite special, and it has a delicious fragrance too. Wonder how sunburned roses look… That’s interesting – have to research that one… As for the salvia – sorry to hear that so many of yours died. All I could remember about mine was that it had ‘Flame’ in its name, so I did a little googling. The full name is Salvia greggii ‘Flame’. I was just too lazy to look it up when I wrote the post, but since you asked… 🙂

  4. Pingback: What’s in Bloom Here Now – Sept 2015 | A Moveable Garden

  5. Evan says:

    I love that rose! Between that and ‘Hot Cocoa’, you have me thinking I need to plant roses now that there’s a fence keeping the deer out. I’d wondered for a few years if Anisacanthus would succeed in the PNW. I saw it in North Carolina and fatalistically assumed it would need too much spring heat and be too finicky about winter wet. Nice to see otherwise! Is that oregano perhaps the same as ‘Amethyst Falls’? I saw them at Garden Fever earlier this summer and foolishly left them behind. I did return later to find Origanum dictamnus, though, to add to my existing huge swaths of ‘Kent Beauty’. Another of the hops-flowered oreganos is Origanum libanoticum. I haven’t seen that one available.

    • annamadeit says:

      Believe it or not, I actually don’t really like roses all that much. But every time I make sweeping generalizations, I get to eat my words. Right now I have four, and three of them proved they were special in one way or another. The fourth came with the house, and needs to come out, except I want to take cuttings of it first – it has amazing fragrance and the petals are edible. It needs to live on somewhere… I am sure the Oregano is Amethyst Falls – not Purple Falls – it sounds totally familiar. My excuse for this mistake is that I tend to have a memory like a gnat (especially for plant names), and last night I was very sleepy when putting together this post. I’m pretty sure it was O. libanoticum I saw at Xera last week. Meant to pick one up, but felt a little overwhelmed with the thought of adding more to my unplanted collection, so I didn’t. Might have to remedy that, after all. They are so fabulous – I love those long, scaly flowers! Arghhh -the angst of a plant addicts dilemmas…!

  6. Rose says:

    Gorgeous photos, Anna! I especially love all the photos of the Hummingbird Bush blooms. I’m not familiar with this plant, but I’m going to look it up and cross my fingers that I can grow it here. I love roses, but I don’t grow many here either, mainly because I don’t want to deal with fussy plants. But I do like to look at other people’s roses:) Happy Bloom Day!

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks Rose, and Happy GBBD to you too! I think the Anisacanthus is hardy to zone 7. You know, with a name like yours you almost HAVE TO grow at least some kind of rose. I’m not a huge rose person, although I do appreciate the few I have. But, I saw this gorgeous one I really truly wish I had room for. It’s called Rosa chinensis ‘Mutabilis’, gets about 5′ tall and wide, and has single flowers that emerge this apricot yellow, and fade to fuchsia pink as it ages. It blooms nonstop through the entire summer. You should check it out – I bet it’s hardy too, and it is fabulous! Can’t imagine it being fussy either, since it’s a species rose. If I only had room…

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