Wednesday Vignette – cheap thrill

*** My apologies to those of you who received this via email on Monday. When I realized my timing was off (still battling the temporal confusion of jet lag, apparently :)),  I deleted it. Sorry about that – here it is again. Happy Wednesday! ***

I imagine being out walking with me, is a little like being out with a dog that stops in front of every conceivable lamp post. Good thing I was not on a leash – I would have driven my fellow compadres bonkers with my constant stops and starts – with every spotted vignette. Last week’s trip to Seattle’s NWFGS offered up plenty of things to see, but the one that evoked instant joy in me – just about every time I saw it- were the safety lights adorning the escalators, reflected into perpetuity. You had to wade through them to get on the escalator. To capture it, I held up the line of eager, impatient visitors for what must have been – heavens forbid – several seconds at a time. Some might have scowled at me, but I don’t care. I honestly think they should have thanked me for showing them one of the more interesting features of the five-day event. As for the show itself – more on that, along with some highlights, in my next post.

Pretty cool, huh?

Pretty cool, huh?

About annamadeit

Born and raised in Sweden, my aesthetics and outlook on life are strongly shaped by a culture rich in history and tradition. I care a great deal about environmental responsibility, and my aesthetic reflects the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia. I was trained as an architect at the University of Cincinnati and as a color specialist at the Scandinavian Colour Institute in Stockholm. I'm obsessed with plants and gardens, and aim to take my skill set a step further by designing gardens as well as interiors. As someone so aptly said: " Architecture is the skin that separates the exterior from the interior". So true - you can't successfully focus on one without incorporating the other. I'm also an avid cook, and I love to ski. In addition, I put time and efforts into trying to rectify things that I feel are wrong in my immediate community. As you will see, The Creative Flux will touch on all these things, and more. For sure, it's all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blog!
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22 Responses to Wednesday Vignette – cheap thrill

  1. Pingback: Wednesday Vignette – two boots | The Creative Flux

  2. In U.K. it is illegal to take photographs on the Underground

    • annamadeit says:

      Really? I imagine that is a fear-based rule? Anyway, this escalator was very much above ground!

      • The regulation came in after the Kings Cross Fire of 1987. Here is the introduction to Wikipedia’s extensive article: The King’s Cross fire broke out on Wednesday 18 November 1987 at approximately 19:30 at King’s Cross St. Pancras tube station, a major interchange on the London Underground. The fire killed 31 people and injured 100 people. As well as the mainline railway stations above ground and subsurface platforms for the Metropolitan lines,[a] there were platforms deeper underground for the Northern, Piccadilly, and Victoria lines. The fire started on an escalator serving the Piccadilly line and 15 minutes after being reported, as the first members of the London Fire Brigade were investigating, the fire flashed over, filling the underground ticket office with heat and smoke.

        The subsequent public inquiry determined that the fire had started due to a lit match being dropped onto the escalator and suddenly increased in intensity due to a previously unknown trench effect. London Underground were strongly criticised for their attitude toward fires. Staff were complacent because there had never been a fatal fire on the Underground, and had been given little or no training to deal with fires or evacuation.

        The publication of the report led to resignations of senior management in both London Underground and London Regional Transport and to the introduction of new fire safety regulations: The King’s Cross fire broke out on Wednesday 18 November 1987 at approximately 19:30 at King’s Cross St. Pancras tube station, a major interchange on the London Underground. The fire killed 31 people and injured 100 people. As well as the mainline railway stations above ground and subsurface platforms for the Metropolitan lines,[a] there were platforms deeper underground for the Northern, Piccadilly, and Victoria lines. The fire started on an escalator serving the Piccadilly line and 15 minutes after being reported, as the first members of the London Fire Brigade were investigating, the fire flashed over, filling the underground ticket office with heat and smoke.

        The subsequent public inquiry determined that the fire had started due to a lit match being dropped onto the escalator and suddenly increased in intensity due to a previously unknown trench effect. London Underground were strongly criticised for their attitude toward fires. Staff were complacent because there had never been a fatal fire on the Underground, and had been given little or no training to deal with fires or evacuation.

        The publication of the report led to resignations of senior management in both London Underground and London Regional Transport and to the introduction of new fire safety regulations.The King’s Cross fire broke out on Wednesday 18 November 1987 at approximately 19:30 at King’s Cross St. Pancras tube station, a major interchange on the London Underground. The fire killed 31 people and injured 100 people. As well as the mainline railway stations above ground and subsurface platforms for the Metropolitan lines,[a] there were platforms deeper underground for the Northern, Piccadilly, and Victoria lines. The fire started on an escalator serving the Piccadilly line and 15 minutes after being reported, as the first members of the London Fire Brigade were investigating, the fire flashed over, filling the underground ticket office with heat and smoke.

        The subsequent public inquiry determined that the fire had started due to a lit match being dropped onto the escalator and suddenly increased in intensity due to a previously unknown trench effect. London Underground were strongly criticised for their attitude toward fires. Staff were complacent because there had never been a fatal fire on the Underground, and had been given little or no training to deal with fires or evacuation.

        The publication of the report led to resignations of senior management in both London Underground and London Regional Transport and to the introduction of new fire safety regulations.

  3. rusty duck says:

    Lol. I can imagine all the looks…

  4. Pretty indeed! I detect a hint of disappointment in the show. Eager to hear about it. 🙂

  5. Peter/Outlaw says:

    Thanks for pointing out this highlight as it’s something that I walk by several times a year and have never taken the time to enjoy! My WV is here: http://outlawgarden.blogspot.com/2016/02/wednesday-vignette_24.html

  6. I wish we would have bumped into each other at the show! Oh and I would have loved to be in the group waiting for you to photograph those lights (which are fabulous!), some heckling would have ensued for sure.

    My WV is also from Seattle, but not the show: http://www.thedangergarden.com/2016/02/wednesday-vignette-east-aloha-street.html

  7. Kris P says:

    You always see things from an interesting perspective, Anna! Maybe your picture-taking gave the crowd behind you an opportunity to see things that way too. Here’s my Wednesday Vignette: http://krispgarden.blogspot.com/2016/02/wednesday-vignettes-spring-jewels.html

  8. Elvis says:

    Trust you to spot the un-obvious, Anna! Actually, I’m not sure I used the main escalator set, so I could be forgiven for missing it. Wish we’d seen each other, but I suspect I was headed home when you were headed north. Looking forward to hearing your take on the show!

    Like Loree, my vignette is in Seattle, but not the NWFGS: http://mulchmaid.blogspot.com/2016/02/wednesday-vignette-black-and-white-for.html

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