Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue…

Well, for the absolute newest in my plant debauchery, please see my last post – the one about my adventurous romp in Hortlandia. All that aside, there are some rather intriguing developments happening in the garden as well – some that I have never seen before.

An old favorite -  Tulipa clusiana 'Lady Jane' has had its time in the sun...

An old favorite – Tulipa clusiana ‘Lady Jane’ has had its time in the sun…

... and now looks like this. Silly me - I love them even when they are at the end of their show. This tulip is a great naturalizer, and kindly reseeds itself wherever it likes. I'm not one to protest.

… and now looks like this. Silly me – I love them even when they are at the end of their show. This tulip is a great naturalizer, and kindly reseeds itself wherever it likes. I’m not one to protest.

Seeing the strappy, blue foliage of a NOID Siberian iris, and out native Vancouveria hexandra growing at its feet always makes me happy in spring.

Seeing the strappy, blue foliage of a NOID Siberian iris, and out native Vancouveria hexandra growing at its feet always makes me happy in spring.

Here, a volunteer rush has planted itself in the middle of a Silver Dollar hebe. I quite like the effect.

Here, a volunteer rush has planted itself in the middle of a Silver Dollar hebe. I quite like the effect.

My Podophyllum pleianthum going nuts in front of what I think is a Metapanax davidii.

My Podophyllum pleianthum going nuts in front of what I think is a Metapanax davidii.

Here is a close-up of that new foliage.

Here is a close-up of that new foliage.

I was thrilled to notice this flower bud on my Melianthus major. This is a first for me, and, in a short-sighted burst of excitement,  I'm stoked, even if I have the onslaught of climate change to thank for it.

I was thrilled to notice this flower bud on my Melianthus major. This is a first for me, and, in a short-sighted burst of excitement, I’m stoked, even if I have the onslaught of climate change and our ridiculously mild winter to thank for it.

My wall of blue.

My wall of blue – Clematis alpina ‘Blue Dancer’.

A close-up of the flowers.

A close-up of the flowers.

White Ipheion flowers - one of my favorite spring bulbs.

White Ipheion flowers – one of my favorite spring bulbs…

... looking great in combination with these Snowflake primulas.

… looking great in combination with these Snowflake primulas. My hope is that they will naturalize happily ever after.

Mulhenbeckia, variegated Lily of the Valley, chartreuse Creeping Jenny and a couple of surviving straps of an old Dracaena.

Mulhenbeckia, variegated Lily of the Valley, chartreuse Creeping Jenny and a couple of surviving straps of an old Dracaena.

Wish I remembered the name of this one. 1/2" flowers edged in white. Some of them are almost violet. This plant comes in a  true blue version as well. This was a gift from my friend Gina. I think it would look fabulous combined with...

Wish I remembered the name of this one. 1/2″ flowers edged in white. Some of them are almost a violet pink. This plant comes in a true blue version as well. This was a gift from my friend Gina. This violet tint makes me think it would look fabulous combined with…

... these - Camas lilies rescued from last year - here in front of Cotinus 'Golden Spirit'.

… these – Camas lilies rescued from last year – here in front of Cotinus ‘Golden Spirit’.

Here is that true blue version of that plant. I got this one at Xera last year. You don't often find flowers of this caliber blue!

Here is that true blue version of that plant. I got this one at Xera last year. You don’t often find flowers of this caliber blue!

Another perennial favorite that sends my heart aflutter - Iris confusa, or Bamboo Iris. You can read more about it here.

Another perennial favorite that always sends my heart aflutter – Iris confusa, or Bamboo Iris. You can read more about it, and se better photos of it here, on my other blog.

Always grateful for the airy twigginess of my Corokia cotoneaster. This time of year, it also sports the loveliest little yellow flowers.

Always grateful for the airy twigginess of my Corokia cotoneaster. This time of year, it also sports the loveliest little yellow flowers.

Finally, as seen growing above a client's garage - an Akebia, or Chocolate vine.

Finally, for the “borrowed” portion of the program, as seen growing above a client’s garage – an Akebia, or Chocolate vine.

I love the little white pearly buds, don't you?

I love the little white pearly buds, don’t you?

 

 

 

About annamadeit

I was born and raised in Sweden, By now, I have lived almost as long in the United States. The path I’ve taken has been long and varied, and has given me a philosophical approach to life. I may joke that I’m a sybarite, but the truth is, I find joy and luxury in life’s simple things as well. My outlook on life has roots in a culture rich in history and tradition, and I care a great deal about environmental stewardship. Aesthetically, while drawn to the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia, I also have a deep appreciation for the raw, the weathered, and the worn - materials that tell a story. To me, contrast, counterpoint, and diversity are what makes life interesting and engaging. Color has always informed everything I do. I’m a functional tetrachromat, and a hopeless plantoholic. I was originally trained as an architect working mostly on interiors, but soon ventured outside - into garden design. It’s that contrast thing again… An interior adrift from its exterior, is like a yin without a yang. My firm conviction that everything is connected gets me in trouble time and time again. The world is a big place, and full of marvelous distractions, and offers plentiful opportunities for inquiry and exploration. I started writing to quell my constant queries, explore my discoveries, and nurture my curiosity. The Creative Flux was started in 2010, and became a catch-all for all kinds of intersecting interests. The start of Flutter & Hum at the end of 2013 marks my descent into plant nerd revelry. I occasionally contribute to other blogs, but those two are my main ones. For sure, topics are all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blogs!
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24 Responses to Something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue…

  1. Alan @ it's not work, it's gardening! says:

    Lots of nice details in your spring garden! Thanks for sharing!

    • annamadeit says:

      Glad you enjoyed it, Alan. I’ve been so busy, I have missed the last two (or maybe even three) Bloom Days. Had to do something to show that it’s not a barren void out there, and that my darling protégées do just fine without me.

  2. Beautiful blue flowers. I need to figure out where I can shoehorn in some Camassias.

  3. Kris P says:

    I love all the blue flowers, especially that fabulous Clematis. I’m also going to be on the look-out for that Hebe.

  4. Alison says:

    Loved seeing these photos if your flowers! I also planted a variety of Primulas with the hope that they might intercross and naturalize. The plant you’re wondering about the name of is Lithodora.

    • annamadeit says:

      We think alike! Few things are nicer than naturalizing spring flowers, methinks. No, the blue flowers are not Lithodoras – but I can see why you thought so – they have the same all-blue and blue-and-white options. They look a bit like oversized Forget-me-nots, but are far better behaved. Had to do a little google search, but finally found it – it is an Omphaloides cappadocica.

  5. Pauline says:

    Love the Clematis alpina, it is stunning! I too love blue flowers and have as many as I can!

  6. LINDA WOODS says:

    Hello Do you keep the Melianthus Major in a pot or in the ground? I live in Vancouver similar conditions to you but my potted melianthus died down. I kept it in a protected area over the winter. There is one shoot at the base of the plant.

    Tks Linda

    • annamadeit says:

      Hi Linda! I keep it in the ground. If we have a really cold winter, it dies back, but it has always come back. I’d say you’d probably be better off putting it in the ground and giving it a good layer of mulch in fall. Usually, things in pots can be considered one climate zone less hardy (or more exposed, if you wish) than plants in the ground. Since you have a shoot coming – just give it time. It’s working on it! 🙂 Thanks also for stopping by!

  7. A lovely bouquet. I, too, liked the Blue Dancer, which I have not seen before

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks Derrick! I expected something more like Frances Rives when I bought it (in my ignorance, I thought most alpinas pretty much looked the same) but was happily surprised! 🙂

  8. bergstromskan says:

    I love the Tulip in its aging process. It can be my role model in aging with more beauty than ever.

  9. rickii says:

    When is the calendar coming out? Your only challenge would be sifting through all your great photos to single out the 12 best.

    • annamadeit says:

      Oh, Rickii – you are such a sweetheart! The sad truth is that I would have no idea how to put together a calendar. Yes, I know there are programs that pretty much do it for you, but I would still have to sit down and learn how. Not exactly my favorite thing to do, but your compliment is a very nice one – so thanks! 🙂

  10. lyart says:

    great garden you seem to have. such a variety of plants and each one looks so healthy and well kept. Love the ipheion, too. In German it is called Sternblume, which means star flower.

  11. FlowerAlley says:

    I wish I could come there with a shovel and buckets. I love blue flowers and I love white flowers and I especially love blue and white flowers. Does the Clematis dance in the breezes. I can just imagine that.

  12. hoov says:

    Wonderful photos–blue obviously inspires you. The clematis makes my heart sing!

  13. annamadeit says:

    Thanks! A few hours out there works miracles on my mood. 🙂

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