Foliage Follow-up – May 2016

Manihot grahamii - a recent purchase that makes me happy every time I see it!

Manihot grahamii – a recent acquisition that makes me happy every time I see it!

A visitor!

A visitor!

My dwarf birch Betula pendula 'Trost's dwarf' in its backlit glory.

My dwarf birch Betula pendula ‘Trost’s dwarf’ in all its backlit glory.

Hebe and Hellebore.

Hellebore and Hebe and Agapanthus beyond.

Acanthus spinosa and Red Dragon maple, with the seed head of a Purple Sensation allium in the middle.

Acanthus spinosa and Red Dragon maple, with the seed head of a Purple Sensation allium poking its head out of the middle.

My black bamboo remained contained for years in its prison. I dug down two feet, and lined the hole with galvanized steel panels. Well, it looks like it has finally found a way out. Yikes - I guess I have some work to do - fast!

My black bamboo remained contained for years in its prison. I had dug down two feet, and lined the hole with galvanized steel panels. Well, it looks like it has finally found a way out. Yikes – I guess I have some work to do – fast! Isn’t it weird how its new shoot looks a little like a dried monkey hand talisman? Hang this around your neck and you will be protected from danger…

I guess I never really looked closely at a bamboo shoot, so I had never seen how fibrous it is.

I guess I never really looked closely at a bamboo shoot, so I had never seen how fibrous it is.

A Dryopteris fern filters the morning light.

A Dryopteris fern filters the morning light.

The blooms of 'Angelina' sedum can pretty much pass for foliage in this combo. I like how the textures are really similar, yet the colors are so different.

The blooms of ‘Angelina’ sedum can pretty much pass for foliage in this combo. I like how the textures are really similar, yet the colors are so different.

It hasn't bloomed yet, but it really doesn't have to. I love the leaves of the Molly-the-witch peony - especially after a rain.

It hasn’t bloomed yet, but it really doesn’t have to. I love the leaves of the Molly-the-witch peony – especially after a rain.

Choysia 'Sundance', orange sedge, Creeping Jenny, Iris confusa,

Choysia ‘Sundance’, orange sedge, Creeping Jenny, and Iris confusa. Black bamboo, and Crocosmia in the background.

Alarm canadense, Daphne atrovariegata, Brunnera 'Jack Frost, variegated Fatsia, and Hydrangea tricolor playing nice in the front yard.

Asarum canadense, Daphne atrovariegata, Brunnera ‘Jack Frost, variegated Fatsia, and Hydrangea tricolor playing nice in the front yard.

Trust's dwarf again, a variegated Hosta, Begonia and Coleus.

Trost’s dwarf again, a variegated Hosta, Tassel fern, Begonia and newly planted Coleus. The ground is covered in little flowers from the Black lace Elderberry high up above.

Comptonia peregrina, some kind of blue hosta, Muhlenbeckia, Creeping Jenny, and variegated Lily of the Valley.

Comptonia peregrina, some kind of blue hosta, Muhlenbeckia, Creeping Jenny, a few straps of a Dracaena, and variegated Lily of the Valley.

I have posted this photo before, but the foliage of Arisaema ringens is so great that it bears repeating.

I have posted this photo before, but the foliage of Arisaema ringens is so great that it bears repeating. By now its leaves are about three times larger than in this photo, that was taken right after it was planted.

Few plants catch water as beautifully as Melianthus major. So, I guess I'll end this post with an image that I seem to photograph every time it happens, in the hopes that it will be better than all the rest. I guess I'll keep trying!

Few plants catch water as beautifully as Melianthus major. So, I guess I’ll end this post with an image that I seem to photograph every time it happens, in the hopes that it will be better than all the rest. I guess I’ll keep trying!

Head on over to Pam at Digging to see what pretty foliage is manifesting itself in gardens around the globe.

 

About annamadeit

I was born and raised in Sweden, By now, I have lived almost as long in the United States. The path I’ve taken has been long and varied, and has given me a philosophical approach to life. I may joke that I’m a sybarite, but the truth is, I find joy and luxury in life’s simple things as well. My outlook on life has roots in a culture rich in history and tradition, and I care a great deal about environmental stewardship. Aesthetically, while drawn to the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia, I also have a deep appreciation for the raw, the weathered, and the worn - materials that tell a story. To me, contrast, counterpoint, and diversity are what makes life interesting and engaging. Color has always informed everything I do. I’m a functional tetrachromat, and a hopeless plantoholic. I was originally trained as an architect working mostly on interiors, but soon ventured outside - into garden design. It’s that contrast thing again… An interior adrift from its exterior, is like a yin without a yang. My firm conviction that everything is connected gets me in trouble time and time again. The world is a big place, and full of marvelous distractions, and offers plentiful opportunities for inquiry and exploration. I started writing to quell my constant queries, explore my discoveries, and nurture my curiosity. The Creative Flux was started in 2010, and became a catch-all for all kinds of intersecting interests. The start of Flutter & Hum at the end of 2013 marks my descent into plant nerd revelry. I occasionally contribute to other blogs, but those two are my main ones. For sure, topics are all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blogs!
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14 Responses to Foliage Follow-up – May 2016

  1. Alan @ it's not work, it's gardening! says:

    So many lovely things shown here! The black bamboo (Phyllostachys nigra) shoots are some of the prettiest. So frilly!

    “Some kind of blue hosta” is my favorite description. I’ve had people ask me about specific plants before and I feel a bit embarrassed not to know what it is exactly. My hostas would fall into that category for sure, as there is only one of them whose name I know.

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks, Alan! Haha – I feel that if I at least get the genus right, I’m in good shape. Hostas, hellebores and heucheras are so abundant and so often near impossible to tell apart. I’m not a collector, so for the most part, I don’t really care, as long as they look halfway decent and fit in the space. There are so many well-versed horticulturalists around us. There is no way I can compete with them in hort-speak – I don’t even try! 🙂

  2. Mark and Gaz says:

    Lovely lot! Wish I could get hold of Manihot grahami here again.

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks! Having lusted for it for years, I couldn’t believe my luck when I saw it. Now I just have to keep it alive… I put it in a rather sheltered position, so fingers crossed it will make it!

  3. Your foliage selections couldn’t be more wonderful! I was already salivating over that Manihot when I saw the dwarf birch. I immediately conducted a search on the latter but was crushed to learn that both climate and its water needs probably put it out of the question here. Oh well,I’ll go find myself a Manihot.

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks Kris! Yeah, birches are a thirsty lot. I’ve heard that a fully grown birch drinks up to 100 gallons per day. Manihots will probably make you happier in that regard. Pretty sure the plant I have came from a California vendor. I found it at the HPSO sale in April. It was labeled “The Tropics”. http://www.thetropicsinc.com

  4. Pam/Digging says:

    The cobra lily is so cool, and all your foliage looks especially lovely beaded with raindrops. It’s scary how a runner bamboo always finds a way to escape, isn’t it? Houdini! Black bamboo is a beauty, though. Thanks for sharing your foliage faves today!

  5. annamadeit says:

    Oh my god, Houdini is right!!! I’m not sure exactly how to tackle it, but I know I’m going to have to do something… and soon! Not at all a well behaved plant.

  6. Pauline says:

    Such a stunning variety of foliage, they are beautiful! Your Acer and the Melianthus Major are my favourites. My Melianthus died a few years ago, i must buy another, I have missed it.

  7. rickii says:

    You have some dynamite combos and color echoes going on there.

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