Post-election Blooms, Pods and Foliage – November 2016

A garden is a good reminder that life goes on, outside of our human drama. And, it its a good place for demons to disperse, and some semblance of sanity to be restored. I spent some time putzing around out there this weekend, and, I have to say, it was good for both heart and mind, despite the drizzle. Check out other distractions from this dreadful situation we’re in, over at May Dreams Gardens, and Digging.

Zauschneria, Brachyglottis greyii, and Eucalyptus. The Euca was planted as a 4" annual two years ago. I guess I'm grateful it's surviving, but I keep hacking it back. Since I expected it to be a temporary joy, I didn't think to give it ample space. So, it is doomed to live out its life as a hard pruned shrub.

Zauschneria, Senecio (or nowadays Brachyglottis) greyii, and Eucalyptus. The Euca was planted as a 4″ annual two years ago. I guess I’m grateful it’s surviving, but I keep hacking it back. Since I expected it to be a temporary joy, I didn’t think to give it ample space. So, the poor thing is doomed to live out its life as a hard pruned shrub. I like its blue, fragrant foliage though – it’s great in arrangements! As is the Senecio, by the way. It looks fantastic with ‘Hot Cocoa’ roses.

Next to the Zauschneria, the Myrtle flowers have mostly been transformed to berries.

Next to the Zauschneria, the Myrtle flowers have mostly been transformed to berries.

There are a lot! Last month, I had just discovered that Myrtles and berries. Someone mentioned that they are edible, so I tried one. They aren't exactly tasty, but do have an astringent taste reminiscent of juniper berries. I'm tempted to see what happens if I try to flavor vodka with it. Maybe it would turn gin-like?

There are a lot! Last month, I had just discovered that Myrtles and berries. Someone mentioned that they are edible, so I tried one. They aren’t exactly tasty, but have an astringent taste rather reminiscent of juniper berries. I’m tempted to see what happens if I try to flavor vodka with it. Maybe it would turn gin-like?

There is an occasional flower left on the shrub, too. Covered in cobwebs, of course.

There is an occasional flower left on the shrub, too. And holding up cobwebs, of course.

Here is the homesteader of that particular web.

Here is the homesteader of that particular web.

Still only a tiny shrublet , but it yields promise - there are buds on my Garrya elliptica 'James Roof'!

Still only a somewhat scrawny, 2′ shrublet , but it yields promise – there are flower buds on my Garrya elliptica ‘James Roof’ or Silver tassel bush, as it is also called.  I think the leathery leaves actually are supposed to look like that – as if somewhat affected by leaf curl.

The seeds in my beloved Magnolia grandiflora seed pods glow like red little jewels.

The seeds in my beloved Magnolia grandiflora seed pods glow like red little jewels.

I'm glad I didn't cut back these mini gladiolus, as their seed pods are kind of cool.

I’m glad I didn’t cut back these mini gladiolus, as their seed pods are kind of cool.

And, I never before realized how decorative the pods of the Anisacanthus can be.

And, I never before realized how decorative the pods of the Anisacanthus can be. Like something one would find dangling from Empress Josephine’s ear lobe.

Saying goodbye to the lovely Stewartia, whose autumn show is over, and now sports these cute little pods against the blue of the sky. It is going to go live in my friend Jason's garden where it will enjoy a lot more space to do its magic.

Saying goodbye to the lovely Stewartia, whose autumn show is over, and now sports these cute little pods against the blue of the sky. It is going to go live in my friend Jason’s garden where it will enjoy a lot more space to do its magic.

Among the seed pods, there more promises of things to come. Here are Edgeworthia buds which, if spared too much icy cold, will put on one hell of a show come spring. Love this plant!

Among the seed pods, there more promises of things to come. Here are Edgeworthia buds which, if spared too much icy cold, will put on one hell of a show come spring. Love this plant!

An Aloe is forming a new bud. Need to remember to bring this one inside, before temperatures drop too far...

An Aloe is forming a new bud. Need to remember to bring this one inside and clean all those decaying leaves off it, before temperatures drop too far… 

A new acquisition; Aster 'Alma Potschke'. Just love that color, especially against the red of the Red 'Dragon' maple in the background.

A new acquisition; Aster ‘Alma Potschke’. Just love that color, especially against the red of the Red ‘Dragon’ maple in the background. Fall is so deliciously vulgar!

Starting the transition... Boy, am I late! Some not at all hardy, and some borderline that probably would have made it had they been in the ground. But hey - I'm a bit behind in my planting...

Another eye-grabbing, red-leaved lovely – Coleus Redhead. Starting the transition… Boy, am I late! Some not at all hardy, and some borderline that probably would have made it had they been in the ground. But hey –  as always, I’m a bit behind in my planting, and I have more than I know what to do with.

I guess this is what happens when grown in a little too much shade; Eupatorium 'Elegant feather' is blooming in November!

I guess this is what happens when grown in a little too much shade; Eupatorium ‘Elegant feather’ is blooming in November!

Likely the last flower of the year for Coreopsis 'Red Satin'. This one has bloomed for months, despite still being confined to a pot.

Another thread-leaf plant. This is likely the last flower of the year for Coreopsis ‘Red Satin’. This one has bloomed for months, despite still being confined to a pot.

Another late bloomer; Fatsia japonica - a late season hummingbird feeder supreme, and bees an bumblebees too.

Another late bloomer; Fatsia japonica – a late season hummingbird feeder supreme, and bees an bumblebees too.

Such cool flowers!

Such cool flowers!

I guess the ants like it, too!

I guess the ants like its sweet nectar, too!

Also still trudging along; 'Hot cocoa' rose. I always marvel over how the color of those orange-red flower buds draw toward black.

Also still trudging along; ‘Hot cocoa’ rose. I always marvel over how the color of those orange-red flower buds draw toward black.

This was a huge surprise for me. Another beauty languishing in a pot, waiting for its forever home. A bigger pot than the gallon it came in, for sure, but still... I honestly didn't expect it to bloom. Clematis 'Wisley cream'.

This was a huge surprise for me. Another beauty languishing in a pot, waiting for its forever home. A bigger pot than the gallon it came in, for sure, but still… I honestly didn’t expect it to bloom. Clematis ‘Wisley cream’.

Here are the flowers, somewhat tattered by all the rain we've had. Really need to find this one a home, and let it lose!

Here are the open flowers, somewhat tattered by all the rain we’ve had. Really need to find this one a home, and let it lose!

This one has truly taken off  since the weather cooled a little; Woodwardia orientalis is putting out new fronds.

This one has truly taken off since the weather cooled a little; Woodwardia orientalis is putting out new fronds.

One of my absolute favorites - Podophyllum pleianthum - is starting its descent into dormancy. All I can do is to thank it for yet another good year.

One of my absolute favorites – Podophyllum pleianthum – is starting its descent into dormancy. All I can do is to thank it for yet another good year.

Canna 'Intrigue' is still developing new leaves. It hasn't bloomed yet (I don't think it gets enough sun), but I honestly don't mind. It's the leaves I'm after.

Canna ‘Intrigue’ is still developing new leaves. It hasn’t bloomed yet (I don’t think it gets enough sun), but I honestly don’t mind. It’s the leaves I’m after.

Canna 'Cleopatra' DID bloom - which was nice - but same here. It's the leaves that set my heart aflutter - not the flowers.

Canna ‘Cleopatra’ DID bloom – which was nice – but same here. It’s the leaves that set my heart aflutter – not the flowers.

I'll end with a shot of the new growth of my baby hardy banana (Musa basjoo) planted a couple of months ago. I'm glad to see, it seems to like its less than ideal spot. I wish I had an entire month unencumbered by any other commitments to finish all the work I need to do, but I don't. So, random shots, and occasional smatterings of progress here and there, will have to make do - for now. :)

I’ll end with a shot of the new growth of my baby hardy banana (Musa basjoo) planted a couple of months ago. I’m glad to see, it seems to like its less than ideal spot. The Ribbon plant next to it has been thriving all summer, but needs to come inside for the winter. I wish I had an entire month unencumbered by any other commitments to finish all the work I need to do, but I don’t. So, random shots, and occasional smatterings of progress here and there, will have to make do – for now. Future posts will highlight what makes it through…  🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About annamadeit

Born and raised in Sweden, my aesthetics and outlook on life are strongly shaped by a culture rich in history and tradition. I care a great deal about environmental responsibility, and my aesthetic reflects the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia. I was trained as an architect at the University of Cincinnati and as a color specialist at the Scandinavian Colour Institute in Stockholm. I'm obsessed with plants and gardens, and aim to take my skill set a step further by designing gardens as well as interiors. As someone so aptly said: " Architecture is the skin that separates the exterior from the interior". So true - you can't successfully focus on one without incorporating the other. I'm also an avid cook, and I love to ski. In addition, I put time and efforts into trying to rectify things that I feel are wrong in my immediate community. As you will see, The Creative Flux will touch on all these things, and more. For sure, it's all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blog!
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21 Responses to Post-election Blooms, Pods and Foliage – November 2016

  1. FlowerAlley says:

    Thank you for the delightful and soothing tour.

  2. A garden and photographs to relax in

  3. Alison says:

    Yes, I have two Garryas, and the leathery leaves always curl like that. I’m looking forward to flowers on mine this winter too. That ribbon plant is intriguingly different.

  4. Evan Bean says:

    Lots to love here, Anna. I’m guessing that Eucalyptus is E. gunnii ‘Silver Drops’, right? I find it ironic that it’s one of the hardiest forms of that species and yet it’s usually sold as an annual. I want more garryas. I wish I could find a cheap source for them. I think Xera might be the cheapest, when they have smaller ones.

    • annamadeit says:

      I think you’re right, Evan. I had no idea it is considered hardy… Do you know how well it transplants? Until you said that, I figured it probably would succumb to cold temperatures any year now… Now I might just have to move it, and give it the space it deserves. As for the Garrya – you are more than welcome to take cuttings of mine, if you like. It came from Xera, originally.

  5. There are all sorts of great goings-on in your garden! Your Garrya elliptica is more than twice as big as mine, which is also tassel-less, but I’m still counting myself lucky that it survived the summer here are a low-water diet. I love that ‘Cleopatra’ Canna.

  6. Alyse says:

    Well said, Anna! You are very quoteable 🙂 …and i just may do that!
    “A garden is a good reminder that life goes on, outside of our human drama. And, it its a good place for demons to disperse, and some semblance of sanity to be restored. I spent some time putzing around out there this weekend, and, I have to say, it was good for both heart and mind, despite the drizzle….”
    I also found the garden healing this weekend.
    Many warm thoughts,
    Alyse

    • annamadeit says:

      Haha – quote away, Alyse! Can you imagine what the world would be like if everyone was a gardener. I imagine it would be just like Bilbo Baggin’s Shire… 🙂

  7. Isn’t it crazy the Edgeworthia are already budded up? I remember being very worried about mine over the cold (12F) winter of 2013/14, so much so I even put socks over them! No worries though, they all bloomed beautifully–then again maybe that was because of the socks?

    • annamadeit says:

      I think it probably was because of the socks. Good idea, though. I only cast a sheet over mine that year, and they barely bloomed at all. The only blooms that survived were on the very lowest branches, if I recall correctly. Everything above was completely frost burned. 😦

  8. Chloris says:

    Interesting to see what is going on in your garden. Thanks for the tour.I find Garrya elliptica gets knocked back in a hard winter or a bit blackened but it survives. I love the Canna ‘ Cleopatra’, what a beauty. Buds on your Edgeworthia? Oh, I haven’ t noticed any on mine, I must go and look.

  9. Rose says:

    As always, your photographs are stunning, Anna, and they always inspire me to look a little closer to see the beauty that is often overlooked. I was thankful for the continued warm weather last week so I could still work in my garden–as you say, a good place to disperse some demons and try to restore some sanity. I’m not sure how I’ll cope this winter!

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks, Rose – and I completely hear you. I guess we’ll have to tackle all those non-plant related projects instead to keep our minds focused on positive things. Soon enough, spring will be here again!

  10. hb says:

    comforting images, thank you. I need them right now.

  11. Pam/Digging says:

    Silver blue and orange is one of my favorite color combos, so I particularly love your top image. Your pics also show the quiet beauty of plants gone to seed. So many reasons to appreciate the autumn garden!

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