Wednesday Vignette – truths and untruths

I’m sure I’m not alone in having done a lot of eye-rolling in the past week. What a crazy state of our union, n’est-ce pas? It’s hard to keep up with all the contortionists and their rhetorical acrobatics. I listen, I watch, I roll my eyes, and thank my good graces for the options luck has afforded me. It’s nice to know there is a back door, should society as we know it implode. I’ll leave it at that.

On an occasion where I happened to roll my eyes upward earlier this summer, I saw this backlit version of Etoile de Hollande – the massive red climbing rose that came with the house. The rich, red, new foliar growth is almost on par with the velvety petals themselves. In the right light, it’s not difficult to mistake one for the other—which, come to think of it is, in a way, reminiscent of the deceptive, deflective posturing and shape- shifting I’m currently trying to decipher. The weeks to follow will no doubt be fascinating fare. Strap yourselves in, folks—it will be a wild ride!

IMG_2197

About annamadeit

I was born and raised in Sweden, By now, I have lived almost as long in the United States. The path I’ve taken has been long and varied, and has given me a philosophical approach to life. I may joke that I’m a sybarite, but the truth is, I find joy and luxury in life’s simple things as well. My outlook on life has roots in a culture rich in history and tradition, and I care a great deal about environmental stewardship. Aesthetically, while drawn to the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia, I also have a deep appreciation for the raw, the weathered, and the worn - materials that tell a story. To me, contrast, counterpoint, and diversity are what makes life interesting and engaging. Color has always informed everything I do. I’m a functional tetrachromat, and a hopeless plantoholic. I was originally trained as an architect working mostly on interiors, but soon ventured outside - into garden design. It’s that contrast thing again… An interior adrift from its exterior, is like a yin without a yang. My firm conviction that everything is connected gets me in trouble time and time again. The world is a big place, and full of marvelous distractions, and offers plentiful opportunities for inquiry and exploration. I started writing to quell my constant queries, explore my discoveries, and nurture my curiosity. The Creative Flux was started in 2010, and became a catch-all for all kinds of intersecting interests. The start of Flutter & Hum at the end of 2013 marks my descent into plant nerd revelry. I occasionally contribute to other blogs, but those two are my main ones. For sure, topics are all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blogs!
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11 Responses to Wednesday Vignette – truths and untruths

  1. Kris P says:

    The back door would be a return to Sweden? I wonder – would they accept a 2nd generation American of Swedish-Finnish descent? Can you believe the “great and unmatched wisdom” comment? It’s as if he’s channeling the Wizard of Oz con. My WV harkens back once again to ongoing remodel woes: https://krispgarden.blogspot.com/2019/10/wednesday-vignette-surrounded-by-mess.html

    • annamadeit says:

      Hey – the way things are headed, you can almost claim refugee status. Worth a shot, methinks. For no other reason than it would reflect terribly on the current state of the US. It would be an entirely new gardening experience for you!

      Yes, we are (again) talking about it. I know no country is trouble free, but still… Longing for common sense and basic human decency mostly maintained – even on a government level.

  2. That’s a beautiful photo. Lucky you to have somewhere else to go, I’m afraid we’re stuck here. All my hopes are pinned on the election, god help us if it doesn’t work out. Here’s my WV:

    http://www.thedangergarden.com/2019/10/wednesday-vignette-tiny-crevice-garden.html

    • annamadeit says:

      It just HAS to work out, but I fear Bill Maher might be right… if it’s close, he will claim election fraud, and refuse to leave. And then Barr & Co will back him in his fantasies – and then we’re all f***ed. Even if we never actually ACT on moving back, I cling to the option like never before. It brings me a kind of bittersweet comfort.

  3. Tina says:

    It’s been a whirlwind, to be sure and so hard to keep up with. We live in crazy town! But, I like your shot–it’s joyful and hopeful and we take that where it’s delivered!

    • annamadeit says:

      So true. If you avert your eyes for even a day, you’ll have missed lots… it’s a lot of work to stay on top of the news! And yes, pretty garden scenes are vital for my ability to digest and decompress. Like RBG says (paraphrasing); “Historians will look back on this period as one of political aberration.”

  4. A beautiful, almost haunting photo. Recent news makes me glad the corruption and madness is finally starting to hurt Trump, but at the same time it’s hard not to feel increasing anxiety. And once Trump is gone, will we be able to start healing the sickness of which he is a symptom?

    • annamadeit says:

      I find the psychology of the GOP’s backing of DT fascinating, to say the least. What on earth does he have on them, making them so maddeningly complicit and supportive of his lies??? As for your last question, one can only hope and pray… You are right, though, he is but a symptom of serious societal flaws. Yikes!

      • He has the cult-like loyalty of GOP primary voters, so any Republican who speaks out against him is likely out of a job. As for why Trump has a cult following, I like something Salman Rushdie wrote about a character in one of his novels: “it is not the civil social norm for which men yearn, but the outrageous, the outsize, the out-of-bounds – for that by which our wild potency may be unleashed. We crave permission openly to become our secret selves.” For secret selves, substitute our racial hatreds, and it’s a pretty good explanation.

  5. tonytomeo says:

    You should enjoy the garden more, and not invite the other stuff in.

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